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Written by
Karolina Spryszyńska

Karolina Spryszyńska

We have the tube in Wrocław!

Have you ever wondered how to best visualize the work of a developer and the process through which a project in an IT company goes? We, have. At the very beginning, it seemed difficult to us because, let’s consider – how to clearly show all the nuances and components, so that everyone could easily understand the whole process? Fortunately, we managed to do it – an idea popped into heads of our developers: ‘Let’s build the tube!’. And it was just the beginning …

Where do we go to?

A leitmotif of the entire undertaking was to show how developers work at Objectivity and how, step by step, they work in a project and cooperate with the other company departments. If you know the character and culture of our company, you know that we don’t like processes and rules, so we needed a clear and legible map, so that, in addition to the main ‘stops’ during the process, it would also show what’s important to us in our daily work.

Why the tube?

Because we have mainly British customers and we often visit the UK. The inspiration must have been the map of the London Underground. Besides, nothing else but the plan of the tube would be clear enough to show that all the project activities greatly affect each other, they influence the formation of the system and that they keep ‘intersecting’ with each other.

dev-map

How is our tube built?

On our map, we have 5 main lines that represent specific processes. On each of them, you’ll find stations that are individual points arranged one after another, which you need to pass to reach your destination. On the background of all the lines you’ll see the zones that represent our values, which affect everything that happens behind the door of Objectivity. These values permeate through each stage of our activity in the project and outside the project.

In the very centre of the map, you’ll find a red loop, the ‘Sprint cycle’ that resembles the circular ‘0’ tram line in Wrocław. This is the very ‘core’ of the development work. Division into stations reflects the subsequent events in a single sprint. Taking a closer look, you’ll see that all the other tube’s directions go through the line, considerably affecting the final shape of the system. The system is influenced by the people, quality, technologies and cooperation between departments.

The ‘Quality’ purple line strongly shapes the course of the project. We provide high class software to our customers and we keep improving on this aspect. Please note that the ‘quality line’ is partly ‘under construction’, but rather it is expanded, because we keep learning new techniques and approaches. In the near future, a new ‘Continuous Deployment’ station will be finished on the ‘Quality’ line.

The ‘Tools’ yellow line shows what technologies and tools are used in the projects.

The ‘Project’ blue line is to show you that all developers are involved in all the work during the construction of the system. They participate in it from the very beginning (even at such early stages as meetings with the ‘potential’ customers), finishing with support after the delivery of the product to the customer.

And the most significant, ‘People’ green line is to show you how people and cooperation are important for us. The work of the whole team is based on respect, trust, experience sharing and joint decision making.

Why is it worth getting on already at the first station?

The tube is to highlight one more important thing. In our company, a developer is not, as you can imagine, someone who spends 8 hours just on ‘keying in’ the code. It’s someone who actively participates in the whole life of the project. Someone involved in every stage, whose influence on that what is ultimately delivered to the customer is enormous. A developer at Objectivity is a craftsman, given all the tools to be able to freely develop themselves and us.

We do hope that when you get on our tube, you’ll go to the last station.

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